Galileo Galilei
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Ed's Favorite Quotations. Emphasis added. References below.

GALILEO GALILEI

   
Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences.

"SALVIATI. . . . unity is the only infinite number."1a

"SALVIATI. . . . I came to the conclusion that in a medium totally devoid of resistance all bodies would fall with the same speed.
"SIMPLICIO. This is a remarkable statement, Salviati. But I shall never believe that even in a vacuum, if motion in such a place were possible, a lock of wood and a bit of lead can fall with the same velocity."1b

"SAGREDO. . . . [M]any other of your views are so far removed from the commonly accepted opinions and doctrines that if you were to publish them you would stir up a large number of antagonists; for human nature is such that men do not look with favor upon discoveries--either of truth or fallacy--in their own field, when made by others than themselves."1c

"SAGREDO. . . . Must we not confess that geometry is the most powerful of all instruments for sharpening the wit and training the mind to think correctly? Was not Plato perfectly right when he wished that his pupils should be first of all well grounded in mathematics? . . .
"SIMPLICIO. Indeed I begin to understand that while logic is an excellent guide in discourse, it does not, as regards stimulation to discovery, compare with the power of sharp distinction which belongs to geometry.
"SAGREDO. Logic, it appears to me, teaches us how to test the conclusiveness of any argument or demonstration already discovered and completed; but I do not believe that it teaches us to discover correct arguments and demonstrations. . .
"1d HUSSERL


     

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642). Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences. Translated by Henry Crew and Alfonso de Salvio. Amherts, NY: Prometheus Books, 1991. (Originally published: New York: Macmillan, 1914.).
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Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems.
  

Galileo Galilei. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems. Edited by Stephen Jay Gould. Translated and with Revised Notes by Stillman Drake, 1981. Foreword by Albert Einstein. Introduction by J.L. Heilbron, 2001. Regents of the University of California, 1953, 1962, 1967. New York, NY: Modern Library, a division of Random House, Inc.
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Sidereus Nuncius, or The Sidereal Messenger.
  

Galileo Galilei. Sidereus Nuncius, or The Sidereal Messenger. Translated with Introduction, Conclusion and Notes by Albert Van Helden. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 1989.
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Galileo Galilei: Toward a Resolution of 350 Years of Debate, 1633-1983.
  

Galileo Galilei: Toward a Resolution of 350 Years of Debate, 1633-1983. Edited by Paul Cardinal Poupard. With Epilogue by John Paul II. Duqesne University Press, 1987.
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* Italics in the original.

1 Galileo Galilei (1564-1642). Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences. Translated by Henry Crew and Alfonso de Salvio. Amherts, NY: Prometheus Books, 1991. (Originally published: New York: Macmillan, 1914.)
a I. First New Science, Treating of the Resistance which Solid Bodies Offer to Fracture. First Day, at 38.
b Ibid., at 72.
c
Ibid., at 83.
d II. Concerning the Cause of Cohesion. Second Day, at 137-138.

MK-BOOKS-GALILEO-20050216.